Neill to probe civil servants and lobbying

Lord Neill’s committee on standards in public life is to investigate lobbying as part of its next inquiry, and expects to call on lobbying industry representatives to give evidence.

Lord Neill’s committee on standards in public life is to

investigate lobbying as part of its next inquiry, and expects to call on

lobbying industry representatives to give evidence.



The committee decided at a meeting last week (PR Week, 23 October), to

investigate lobbying in the light of last July’s ’cash for access’

scandal including allegations that former GPC lobbyist Derek Draper was

in close contact with former colleague Roger Liddle, now part of the

Downing Street policy unit.



The committee aims to look at the relationship between civil servants,

including special advisers, and lobbyists - both consultants and

in-house staff. This will include the rules governing civil servants

leaving the public sector to join public affairs consultancies.



After the committee’s first report, which concentrated on MPs, the House

of Commons decided to ban MPs from acting as paid advocates for third

parties. Whether MPs have financial links to lobbying firms is open to

interpretation by the Commons Standards and Privileges Committee.



The PRCA, IPR and APPC are expected to be consulted and may be called to

give evidence to the committee early next year.



Neill said: ’We ought to look again at issues from our first report in

the light of the most recent developments.’



’We will want to consider the implementation of recommendations in our

first report in relation to: civil servants and their relationship with

ministers, including issues relating to lobbying,’ he said.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.