Glaxo hires CPR for anti-smoking brief

Glaxo Wellcome has hired CPR Worldwide to mount a pan-European anti-smoking campaign ahead of the launch of its first smoking cessation product, Zyban.

Glaxo Wellcome has hired CPR Worldwide to mount a pan-European

anti-smoking campaign ahead of the launch of its first smoking cessation

product, Zyban.



Work started last week on the consumer and specialist healthcare

account, which carries a six-figure fee and is based in London.



The account was won after a three-way pitch against Manning Selvage and

Lee and Cohn and Wolfe.



The brief is to raise public and governmental awareness of the heath

hazards and cost to the taxpayer of smoking-related illness. The agency

is co-ordinating the account, liaising with the European offices of

affiliate Fleishman-Hillard.



Glaxo Wellcome claims Zyban, which is taken orally, is the first

non-nicotine prescription medication to help people quit smoking.



CPR will handle launch activities and target both consumer and medical

audiences, and will also work with the World Health Organisation (WHO)

to produce educational materials about the hazards of smoking.



The work is part of the European Partnership Project on Tobacco

Dependence, a WHO initiative taken up in conjunction with Glaxo Wellcome

and rival pharmaceutical giants Pharmacia and Upjohn and Novartis

Consumer Health.



’Part of the brief is to highlight the benefits of initiating smoking

cessation projects to governments,’ said CPR Worldwide director, Steve

Carroll.



Pending governmental approval, Glaxo Wellcome expects to launch Zyban in

the Netherlands within the next two months. It has already been

successfully launched in the US, Canada and Mexico and has helped more

than one million people quit smoking.



There are around 1.1 billion smokers in the world.



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