What The Papers Say: Ebullient Keegan rises from Hoddle’s ashes

In footballing parlance, the lad done good. After his first match as England manager, Kevin Keegan was King Canute, turning the tide of media criticism that drowned Glenn Hoddle by sheer force of character, not to mention the feet and hands of Paul Scholes.

In footballing parlance, the lad done good. After his first match

as England manager, Kevin Keegan was King Canute, turning the tide of

media criticism that drowned Glenn Hoddle by sheer force of character,

not to mention the feet and hands of Paul Scholes.



Riding behind was Fulham FC owner Mohammed al Fayed, promising Keegan as

a ’gift to the nation’, an offer even those who wish to see him denied a

British passport acknowledged would work in the Harrods boss’

favour.



The Football Association was presented as waiting with bated breath for

the outcome of the ’will he stay or will he go’ dilemma and English

football in general was a PR winner in the coverage of the vital Poland

game.



But Hoddle’s time in charge was again presented as a ’vortex of

failure ... (full) of subterfuge and paranoia’ (Times, 27 March). Keegan

is much more comfortable with both the media and his players. With

regard to fun and the business in hand, unlike Hoddle, he was able to

find a happy medium.



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA International. Cuttings supplied by the

Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What The Papers Say’ can be found at:

www.carma.com.



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