MEDIA: What The Papers Say - Nuclear waste deepens Scottish divisions

The boss was away last week when the nuclear waste hit the fan and was caught on the hop by press exposure that Dounreay would become the latest dumping ground for Soviet uranium. The secrecy of the deal with President Clinton was the main complaint with little credence given to the Government’s belated assurance that the public would have been told in time. A statement that the reprocessed material would be used to treat NHS cancer patients provided a convenient smokescreen.

The boss was away last week when the nuclear waste hit the fan and

was caught on the hop by press exposure that Dounreay would become the

latest dumping ground for Soviet uranium. The secrecy of the deal with

President Clinton was the main complaint with little credence given to

the Government’s belated assurance that the public would have been told

in time. A statement that the reprocessed material would be used to

treat NHS cancer patients provided a convenient smokescreen.



SNP leader Alex Salmond hopped on the bandwagon, squealing louder than

all the environmentalists put together. In fact, an internecine rift

appeared among the pressure groups with Scotland Against Nuclear Dumping

giving a moral endorsement to Britain’s acceptance of responsibility for

the shipment.



Criticism of the current state of the Dounreay plant was not helped by

the resignation of Britain’s ’nuclear police chief’ in the wake of mock

Special Boat Services raids on Sellafield and Dounreay revealing

security doubts.



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA International. Cuttings supplied by the

Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What The Papers Say’ can be found at:

www.carma.com.



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