MEDIA: Men behaving well in sales’

Sales of the new breed of men’s health magazines launched last year have leapt, adding to the overall buoyancy of the men’s magazine market and confounding critics who said they wouldn’t sell.

Sales of the new breed of men’s health magazines launched last year have

leapt, adding to the overall buoyancy of the men’s magazine market and

confounding critics who said they wouldn’t sell.



While sales figures for men’s magazines are still considerably lower

than for women’s glossies, they have not suffered the falling sales

experienced by several women’s monthlies in the latest round of ABC

sales figures for the second half of last year.



One year after its launch Rodale Press’ Men’s Health has increased its

sales to 120,371 making it the third ranking title in the overall men’s

market behind IPC’s Loaded (up 85 per cent to 174,763) and Conde Nast’s

GQ which increased sales by two per cent to 128,722.



If overseas and bulk sales are stripped out, Men’s Health is the UK’s

second-biggest selling title. Dennis Publishing’s Maxim, launched in

April 1995, increased sales by 25 per cent to 98,067 on its first three

month audit. Stonehart’s XL failed to match its rivals’ figures and was

this week sold to Affinity.



Emap’s FHM was up year-on-year by 42 per cent to just over 115,000.

Sales of Wagadon’s Arena and The Face were also up. The National

Magazine Company’s Esquire was the only men’s title to suffer a fall in

sales.



‘Who would have bet 12 months ago that the two best selling men’s titles

in the UK would be Men’s Health and Loaded,’ said Men’s Health publisher

Nick Williams. ‘Loaded is helping our cause because, after a few years

of following the lifestyle, its readers will need the advice of Men’s

Health magazine to survive past the age of 30.’



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