Campaign: H&K gets plastic boxes onto the news agenda - Consumer

Campaign: Lock & Lock Containers Client: Hanacobi PR team: Hill & Knowlton Timescale: August 2004-July 2005 Budget: £50,000-£100,000

The Lock&Lock food storage container is a relatively new brand in the UK. The range, with a unique four-sided locking mechanism, was first introduced in South Korea in 1998 by based parent company Hanacobi, and annual sales have doubled every year.

It is now sold in 55 countries.

Marketed as stylish, high-end product, the range is only available in premium stores such as Selfridges, Harrod's, House of Fraser and John Lewis, as well as some cookery outlets. Hill & Knowlton was tasked with running a fresh PR drive for the products.

Objectives

To increase brand awareness and market credibility. To extend share and challenge the UK's market leaders in food storage.

Strategy and Plan

Plastic storage has never had a reputation for generating the most interesting of news stories, and H&K had the challenge of trying to tap in to the news agenda of the media serving the main target audience - women aged between 25 and 65. After an initial period where press releases and samples were sent to journalists, the team concentrated on more creative ideas.

Using its partnership with business-woman and 'organisation expert' Dawna Walter, H&K tried to stimulate debate about 'the all-important issue of food storage' to raise awareness of Lock&Lock's new range. Newsrooms were sent top tips for food storage, and the agency worked alongside newspapers and radio stations to offer competitions, with Lock&Lock plastic containers as prizes.

Throughout the campaign period, H&K used as many hooks as possible to make the containers relevant - during holiday periods they were presented as ideal for travel, on Father's Day they were sold as 'tool kits', and for the summer they were marketed as suitable for alfresco eating.

The campaign also piggybacked on such events as Spring Cleaning Week and National Food Safety Week and seized any opportunity to highlight food wastage.

Measurement and Evaluation

Coverage in the nationals included the Sunday Express, The Independent, the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror.

Regional papers Manchester Evening News and the Western Daily Press also ran features.

Magazine interest included Now, Woman, Adore, 9 'til 5, Ideal Home, Delicious, Hello!, and many other women's, home and fitness publications.

Online forum iVillage also gave space to Lock&Lock.

Across radio, the competition to win plastic containers featured on 49 stations. Walter's involvement inspired news items on 50 stations nationwide, including BBC Radio Solent, Radio Kent and Radio Devon.

Results

According to the company, the campaign produced an impressive ROI.

Rachel Carlyle, who writes a parenting column in the Sunday Express Magazine, says: 'The campaign identified that the containers would be good for parents, and the PR team sent me some. I wouldn't have been that bothered, but H&K persisted in calling me.

'I tried the products out and found them to be great for parents. The PR team had really thought it out.'

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