Labour has biggest share of support on social media

Labour has a 35 per cent share of the voice on social media across all key election topics, according to a study by social analytics firm Crimson Hexagon.

Ed Miliband: His party is beating David Cameron's Conservatives in share of voice on social media
Ed Miliband: His party is beating David Cameron's Conservatives in share of voice on social media

UKIP followed in second place with a 33.2 per cent share, the Conservatives had a 25 per cent share, while the Liberal Democrats had just seven per cent.

The study analysed conversations on social media to reveal which voters dominated the key election topics online.

Conservative voters had a 47 per cent share of the voice on social media around the economy, while Labour supporters dominated talk about education with 53 per cent.

On the topics of Europe and foreign policy, UKIP supporters held 61 per cent share of the voice, followed by Labour with 20 per cent.

Climate change was another close call between the two parties, with 38 per cent for Labour and 33 per cent for UKIP.

UKIP voters dominated talk of immigration with 64 per cent, followed by Labour with 27 per cent and the Conservatives with nine per cent.

The NHS was a popular topic for Tory voters with 38 per cent of the voice, followed by Labour with 34 per cent, UKIP with 24 per cent and the Lib Dems with five per cent.

Lib Dem supporters were the only party to lack a dominant view on any of the topics analysed.

The research also looked at shared interests or affinities of supporters of a particular political party. It found that UKIP supporters were 40 times more likely to be interested in Jihad than other social media users, while Labour supporters were 16 times more likely to be interested in feminism.

The study also showed that Tory supporters were 163 times more likely to be interested in the NHS, while Lib Dem supporters were 493 times more likely to be interested in Russell Brand.

Liliana Osorio, EMEA marketing manager at Crimson Hexagon, said: "Social media is offering an invaluable insight into the concerns of UK voters. Political parties who are able to harness this awareness will gain an unparalleled advantage as they begin to take notice of the subjects that are at the forefront of the public consciousness."

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