Seeing red: put an end to the serial 'compers'

People who enter every competition going are not likely to engage with your brand, says Jennifer Teale, PR manager, retail, leisure & lifestyle at Rumpus PR

Jennifer Teale: "The ‘serial comper’ has become the bane of many a PR professional’s life"
Jennifer Teale: "The ‘serial comper’ has become the bane of many a PR professional’s life"

The art of devising a social media competition for your client is one that is frequently overlooked. Those who don’t understand the importance of quality engagement often see online competitions as a quick fix for hitting those ambitious targets – but they are so much more than that.

The rise in popularity of online competitions has led to the growth of a whole new subculture – the ‘serial comper’. Often faceless Twitter-eggs with accounts dedicated solely to entering competitions (usernames such as ‘SarahLuvsComps’ are usually a bit of a giveaway), they hover over their mouse ready to click ‘like’ or ‘retweet’, regardless of the brand, product or service on offer.

They are becoming an increasingly difficult bunch to avoid, which is why it has never been more important to plan your campaign effectively.

A good rule of thumb is to craft your content around your desired fan base – after all, Brenda the retiree is hardly likely to invest in your high-caffeine energy drink long-term, even if she does win a crate of it through a #FreebieFriday competition.

It’s also worth choosing a mechanism that either rewards brand loyalty from your existing fan base, or involves brand research when targeting potential new fans.

Not only will this help to strengthen your key messages, but it will weed out lazy compers who tend to prefer competitions requiring little to no effort.

The ‘serial comper’ has become the bane of many a PR professional’s life – particularly for those tasked with the job of choosing a suitable winner – but with a carefully devised competition, you’ll be able to keep the Brendas at bay.

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