Five ways US journalists are making their stories more shareable: Edelman

Journalists are incorporating five key elements into their stories to make them more socially shareable: videos and photos, brevity, localization, more use of human voice, and a proximity to trending topics, according to a study from Edelman.

See the full infographic below, or click on the link to download.
See the full infographic below, or click on the link to download.

NEW YORK: Seventy-six percent of US journalists are feeling more pressure than ever to think about how their stories can be shared on social platforms, according to an Edelman study.

The online survey, conducted by Edelman Media Network in collaboration with MuckRack and Edelman Berland, asked more than 250 journalists about how technology and social media are changing how they do their jobs. Social data for the survey came from NewsWhip.

According to the research, journalists are incorporating five key elements into their stories to make them more socially shareable: videos and photos, brevity, localization, more use of human voice, and a proximity to trending topics.

While only 13% of journalists are using consumer-generated videos in their stories and 3% are leveraging corporate videos, nearly 75% are creating original video content for their articles, the study states.

When asked what trends will have an impact on their profession in 2015, the journalists surveyed said an increase in mobile-friendly content, faster turnaround times, more original video, smaller newsroom staffs, and the growing influence of social media.

Also, 75% of journalists said they use Twitter to build their own personal brands.  

"[Communicators] have to arm journalists with assets that we think, and hopefully they will think, will make their stories more shareable," explained Steve Rubel, chief content strategist at Edelman. "We should make available what we think they will find interesting, useful, and informative, but it should layer in some level of understanding around what we think could have social capital for the journalist, without sacrificing news value."

Rubel added that communications professionals also need to understand what assets get shared the most and the algorithms used by social networks and how they are not created equal.

In addition to finding out information from journalists, the survey revealed that 5% of the most shared articles originated from UK publishers, an insight that Rubel said is important when thinking about the "global nature of media and social networks."

Facebook is the top platform for social interactions, and the most-engaged webites on the network are "non-legacy media publishers," such as BuzzFeed, Mashable, and The Huffington Post, the research stated.

When it comes to the most shares on Twitter, BBC, The New York Times, and Mashable topped the list, and Forbes, The New York Times, and Business Insider receive the most shares on LinkedIn.

Rubel said Edelman plans to continue to study the dynamic between traditional media and social media and news consumption, with plans of unveiling a larger analysis later this quarter.

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