Unilever set to roll out first TV campaign, a CSR effort, for its corporate brand

Each market, including Indonesia and the US, has honed in on a sustainability issue prevalent in its market, and each ad features a young person delivering an inspiring speech about sustainable living.

For the first time, Unilever is planning to advertise its corporate brand on TV as part of its global Project Sunlight CSR campaign that aims to raise awareness of sustainability, while championing the vision of young people.

The CPG giant is rolling out the TV ad to five markets. Its UK spot will debut during the British version of The X Factor on Sunday night. It will be the first time Unilever has advertised its corporate brand on TV. Its goal is to raise awareness of food poverty, hygiene, and food waste.

Each county, including Indonesia and the US, has honed in on a sustainability issue prevalent in its market, and each ad features a young person delivering an inspiring speech about sustainable living.

The UK version of the ad aims to highlight the paradox of food waste versus food poverty focused on findings from a Unilever and Oxfam report on the issue that shows 42% of households consider it difficult to live on their income. Meanwhile, three-quarters (75%) of people continue to throw away food that could have been eaten.

Unilever also rolled out this ad on Friday as part of the Project Sunlight effort.

Working with the charity, Unilever has launched #ClearAPlate, a campaign encouraging people to eat all their food as a sign of commitment to driving down waste. It has also pledged to provide 500,000 meals to families in need.

Jon Goldstone, VP of brand building for food and refreshments at Unilever UK, said that "this is a truly exciting time in Unilever’s history – the public launch of our corporate brand and what we stand for.

"We’ve made good progress in sustainability since the launch of the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan in 2010, but consumer behavioral change is still the most challenging area for us, so we hope that through this campaign we can get our shoppers on board, living more sustainably," he said. "We hope people will think about their food waste in the context of people who cannot afford to eat properly."

This story originally appeared on the website of Marketing.

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