Coalition works with Ogilvy on election year effort

NEW YORK: Opportunity Nation, a coalition of more than 250 organizations, has selected Ogilvy Public Relations to lead PR and media relations for its election year campaign.

NEW YORK: Opportunity Nation, a coalition of more than 250 organizations, has selected Ogilvy Public Relations to lead PR and media relations for its election year campaign.

Opportunity Nation launched the effort last November, with the goal of raising awareness of declines in economic mobility in the US and stimulating legislation to improve economic opportunities. The coalition includes businesses such as Staples, nonprofits like United Way Worldwide, educational institutions, and think tanks.

Ogilvy began working with Opportunity Nation on June 1. Jennifer Risi, head of the agency's Media Influence group, is leading a team of three that is working on the campaign from New York.

The coalition selected Ogilvy for its media relations approach, said Christopher Cashman, director of communications at Opportunity Nation. 

“As the media landscape changes, the people and firms who will be successful are those that ride the wave of current trends but never lose sight that this business is based on relationships,” Cashman said. 

Ogilvy will reach out to high-profile national media outlets such as CNN, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal, Risi said. The agency will also create videos and other content to share on social media platforms and with traditional media.  

“Our challenge is making sure we focus on the issue, and not making it about Republicans versus Democrats,” Risi said.

Opportunity Nation plans to host a national summit in September in Washington with 1,500 thought leaders to share perspectives on economic opportunity, Cashman said.

Opportunity Nation launched in November 2011 at a national summit in New York, months after nonprofit Be the Change formed the coalition in response to reports on declining economic mobility, Cashman said. Ogilvy is the group's first agency.

“A child born in a low-income household today has a much harder time moving up to the middle class,” Cashman said. “We asked ourselves, ‘Why isn't anyone talking about this?'”

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