Future of news calls for innovation

The news industry is in a state of flux, but innovation and entrepreneurship are key to ensuring future success, explained Richard Gingras, head of news products at Google.

The news industry is in a state of flux, but innovation and entrepreneurship are key to ensuring future success, explained Richard Gingras, head of news products at Google.

Gingras explained the importance of content architecture, the evolution of the narrative form, and rethinking the way communications and journalism are taught during a presentation at the 2012 Edelman Academic Summit. His presentation fit the conference tagline, “When all media is social.”

Much of Gringas' commentary involved speculation and questions about the successful news models of the future. He raised a number of ideas, many of which are drastic departures from most “standard” journalism today.

For instance, computational journalism may help create automated investigative reports in the future, Gingras said, meaning investigative reporting won't disappear.

Additionally, news outlets must think about designing and maintaining work cultures that encourage constant innovation. They must consider “how to staff news organization with resources and a mindset so innovation is engrained into the organization's DNA,” Gingras said.

This applies to education as well. Journalism and communications students must be taught to focus on innovation and realize that mistakes are OK, as long as students learn from and quickly move beyond them.

“Innovation must be constant,” Gingras said. He adds that students need to “not only be comfortable with [innovation,] but to thrive in that environment."

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