Romney addresses nation, but Eastwood steals show

American political conventions are among the most scripted of all events, from the order of the speakers to the placement of the balloons dropped from the ceiling. So what was Clint Eastwood doing on stage?

American political conventions are among the most scripted of all events, from the order of the speakers to the placement of the balloons dropped from the ceiling.

So why did Clint Eastwood take the stage between an inspirational video about Republican candidate Mitt Romney that even his opponents said was well done and Romney's address to delegates and the nation? Your guess is as good as mine.

Eastwood's “address” to the Republican National Convention, in which he spoke to an imaginary version of President Barack Obama in a chair, was widely ridiculed by political pundits. They assailed the appearance for being off-color, out of touch, and more importantly, for delaying the climax of the convention (Romney's speech carried over past 11pm on the East Coast).

It's hard to believe that the seasoned political pundits running the Romney campaign didn't vet Eastwood's speech before he took the stage. They may have approved, or Eastwood may have gone way off script.

Either way, GOP strategists didn't get the “Halftime in America” Eastwood from Chrysler's ultra-popular Super Bowl ad that they were probably hoping for.  

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