Citizen Paine: Agency Business Report 2013

Citizen Paine says 2012 was arguably the best year in its history, as it enjoyed both top- and bottom-line growth following a major rebrand the prior year.

Principal: Daryl McCullough, CEO, Citizen Paine, chairman, Citizen Relations
Ownership: Vision7 International (EDC Communications)
Offices: US: New York; Los Angeles; Irvine, CA
Global: 8*
Revenue: Global: $28,733,327; US: $16,713,014
Headcount: Global: 153; US: 76
* includes Citizen Optimum (Canada) and Citizen Brando (UK)

Citizen Paine says 2012 was arguably the best year in its history, as it enjoyed both top- and bottom-line growth following a major rebrand the prior year.

“Last year saw the maturation of the brand,” says CEO Daryl McCullough, who also serves as chairman of Citizen Relations. “We had growing pains in 2011 with the launch of the rebrand and restructure. As such, last year was about stabilizing and getting everybody working well together.”

Integration of its leadership team was its “most aggressive” initiative last year. In North America, McCullough led an integration program called “Lead.Change” based around pillars of excellence such as client success, product innovation, and team development.

Citizen Paine's leadership integration and stabilization efforts meant that it made no senior hires during the year.

Global revenue grew 7% to $28.7 million, while US revenue grew by 9% to $16.7 million.

McCullough attributes its growth to strong integrated offerings across its global and North American offices, and without a local office profit-center model, clients get access to the best talent wherever they are. 

Growth came equally for organic and new business, according to McCullough, who says the agency's strategy of making itself “indispensible” to fewer but bigger clients remains in place.

Among those clients, Citizen Paine expanded its global work for Old Spice and Pampers. It had two “game-changing” wins over the year, but is contractually restricted from naming them. Its only loss was American Suzuki Motor Corporation, which pulled out of the US.

Strong areas
Consumer packaged goods and consumer technology continue to be its strongest verticals. Notable work in this category is Duracell's Power Forward activity, a crisis response initiative that gives power to communities afflicted by natural disasters.

Public service and healthcare areas proved to be volatile in 2012 and are seeing less growth. In 2013, the agency plans to leverage its relationship with sister firms in the EDC Group, such as ad agency Dare, to strengthen its integrated offering.

“We'll exploit assets in our family,” says McCullough. “We have a model that sets us up for success in this space.”

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