Super Bowl opportunities, advantages of radio, more

Celebrities running through the media have become an annual tradition during Super Bowl week. To most effectively use them, there are a few things to consider, says David Schwab, MD of First Call, Octagon's celebrity acquisition and activation division.

The Super Bowl
How can PR pros take advantage of the increased media attention around the Super Bowl?
Celebrities running through the media have become an annual tradition during Super Bowl week. To most effectively use them, there are a few things to consider, says David Schwab, MD of First Call, Octagon's celebrity acquisition and activation division.

“You don't need to overpay for talent at the Super Bowl,” he notes. “The difference between A-, B-, and C-list celebrities is minimized this week because of the attention and willingness of the media to have all athletes and celebrities on their air.”

Use your brand's endorsee early in the week before there is brand saturation, or even the Monday after the game when everyone is still listening to the radio, reading results online, or watching TV, Schwab suggests.

“Make sure you have language in your contract ensuring that your promotional time is one of the athlete/celebrity's first activities during the week,” he adds.

Radio
How do I capitalize on radio's immediacy to turn around a story quickly for broadcast?

Have as much ready ahead of a story breaking as possible, says Susan Matthews Apgood, president of News Generation. Since radio production has fewer elements than TV, it can be more responsive if news breaks.

“While you do not have to worry about a publication or print time, you are competing with Web updates and blog postings,” she says. “The deadline is always as soon as information can get to stations, since there is a fluid flow of information continually working with radio.”

Since many stories are broken on radio before TV or print, pitch radio first if your story has immediacy.

“Also, pitching stations in the morning, when news-rooms are fully staffed, typically yields the [best] results and can boost reception of your story,” adds Apgood.

Media relations
What should I do to keep up with the many significant changes in the media landscape?
The past year has brought immense changes to traditional media, including thousands of layoffs at top-100 papers. Journalists today can also be found using Twitter, blogs, and other mediums to interact directly with PR pros, says Eric Hill, president of MyMediaInfo.

“These changes, and the increasing methods for communication, have made it very difficult for a publicist to build relationships,” he notes. “A major challenge for every publicist is to identify who are the key influencers within their vertical market.”

If you don't understand how a journalist prefers to communicate, your chances of greater coverage suffer. Hill recommends identifying the key journalists within your field and then studying how they communicate. For example, do they have a blog or a Twitter account?

“Without proper planning, a great deal of time and effort can be wasted,” he notes.

Send your questions to:
toolbox@prweek.com. Please contact Beth Krietsch if you are interested in contributing to PR Toolbox or to suggest ideas for future columns.

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