In product placement matters, be specific

Last week's inaugural weekly newsletter included a technique story about earned product placement, a timely topic in light of the over-the-top Subway placement in...

Last week's inaugural weekly newsletter included a technique story about earned product placement, a timely topic in light of the over-the-top Subway placement in the NBC program Chuck.

In addition to the sources in the article, I spoke with Stan Steinreich, CEO of Steinreich Communications, which has worked with clients such as 1-800-Mattress. Steinreich suggests that PR pros select product placement opportunities carefully so it doesn't prove damaging to the brand. In his example, 1-800-Mattress got an offer to place the brand in a movie. However, a main character would ultimately die on the mattress.

"In the end, we opted not to participate, because we didn't think there would be a positive associate with the brand," said Steinreich.

He also suggests specificity in order to avoid misunderstandings between the brand and the production company. Digging into the details of how a product will be used, who will be responsible for conditions on-set, and how the product will be displayed ultimately keep issues at bay. In addition, when you're dealing with a high-cost product, like a mattress, hashing out the details saves money.

"We can't take [a] mattress back," he said. "Once the plastic has been cut off, they own it. You want to make sure, with something like that, there's more control."

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.