This month's buzziest Web service: Almost.at

Almost.at is a Web-based tool that allows users to follow events in real time across Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, and a variety of other online services.

What: Almost.at is a Web-based tool that allows users to follow events in real time across Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, and a variety of other online services. The site also allows users to specify which Twitter members are at an event, rather than just Tweeting about it secondhand. It lets users know the links that are most often retweeted. Upcoming features on the site include allowing users to moderate embedded Twitter feeds on their Web page.

How: Because Twitter users use the hash tag for all Tweets related to an event, it's hard to decipher those who are actually at the event and those just talking about it. To solve this, Almost.at aggregates the hash tag Tweets, but then allows users to mark the Tweets that are coming from the event firsthand.

Users check a plus sign next to a Tweet if the person seems as if they are at the event, then add them to their followees list for the event. The Tweets that are marked as actually being from the event will appear highlighted on everyone's feed.

Why: It allows PR pros to easily track real-time feedback from events, in addition to being able to respond to real-time questions, comments, or complaints. At live events like conferences, PR pros can also locate activities that are relevant for the brand, as well as reach specific attendees directly to come learn about the brand. The upcoming moderating feature also allows PR pros to embed Twitter feeds within Web pages, while still being able to moderate Tweets that include irrelevant or derogatory messages.

Who: William Brent, SVP at Weber Shandwick, has considered opportunities to use the technology. “Strategically, it offers a way for event organizers and sponsors to engage more intimately with attendees, and to extend their reach to virtual attendees,” he says.

“Moreover, it appears to allow companies to easily promote their own events, virtual or real.” The service could also be used to monitor items that are garnering social media buzz, pre-event promotion, and to be a part of an event even if you're unable to attend, Brent adds.

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