Deutsche Bank raises awareness about global warming

NEW YORK: In its continuing efforts to build awareness about climate change, Deutsche Bank unveiled The Carbon Counter, a 70-foot high digital billboard located near New York's Madison Square Garden that tracks the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases in real time.

NEW YORK: In its continuing efforts to build awareness about climate change, Deutsche Bank unveiled The Carbon Counter, a 70-foot high digital billboard located near New York's Madison Square Garden that tracks the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases in real time.

Launched on June 18, The Carbon Counter is also online, posted on the www.know-the-number.com homepage, a site that also includes a Carbon Counter widget and information about DB Climate Change Advisors. This Deutsche Asset Management business provides investment products rooted in the climate change issue. Deutsche Bank launched its first climate change mutual fund in 2006.

On the launch date, there was a morning ceremony in Manhattan and a luncheon attended by about 300 guests including scientists and media. The morning event was also available to those who couldn't be on-site via live webcast and satellite feed. A Twitter page specific to the effort launched just prior to June 18.

Deutsche Bank enlisted MS&L for the effort, and the agency's New York and Washington offices, as well as Capital MS&L in London worked on the launch, according to David Schraeder, VP in the corporate practice at MS&L. In addition to driving attendance to the offline events, the firm also executed a media outreach campaign that it said resulted in coverage in a number of outlets including the AP and Reuters, Good Morning America, and on more than 100 blogs including The Huffington Post.

The Carbon Counter is not directly related to any of Deutsche Bank's products or services, according to Schraeder. Rather, there are two key audiences for this public awareness campaign: government and policymakers, which set regulation on the global warming issue, and the investment community, who will help the government finance the solution. A representative from Deutsche was not available for comment.

“It will take hundreds of billions to finance the companies that are able to solve this problem and governments can't finance that all on their own,” said Schraeder. “That's where the capital markets come in.”

The Carbon Counter billboard will remain in place over the next few years.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.