A digital death is not in the stars

PRWeek salutes your tenacity, creativity, and word play, Alicia Keys. The only problem with your Digital Life Sacrifice campaign is that you really can't generate awareness these days by sacrificing digital life.

PRWeek salutes your tenacity, creativity, and word play, Alicia Keys. The only problem with your Digital Life Sacrifice campaign is that you really can't generate awareness these days by sacrificing digital life. 

Starting December 1, on World AIDS Day, the musician asked social media-saturated stars such as Kim Kardashian to avoid the digital landscape and succumb to a "digital death." They were asked to do so until fans could raise $1 million for Keys' Keep a Child Alive HIV/AIDS charity and resuscitate the celebrities' intellectually stimulating digital voices so fans can once again spend every day staring at a Twitter screen so not to miss news about Kim enjoying 5am boot camp. 

Shockingly slow to donate by December 6, fans only raised $500,000. Keys had to get philanthropist Stewart Rahr to match the amount. 

A week after launch, the site stated, "With your help we raised over $1,000,000 to fight HIV/AIDS in Africa and India."

As morbid as it is, people move on. Even news of death, especially a virtual death in the Twittersphere, will eventually disappear from RSS feeds. If you're trying to get your Twitter followers on-board to donate a million bucks, don't silence the celebrities on-board to encourage donation. 

And if Justin Timberlake, Lady Gaga, Jennifer Hudson, and Elijah Wood are only a handful of the beloved celebrity participants who agreed to participate and together they couldn't generate more than $500,000, something must be inherently wrong with the organization's use of celebrity power. It's also an indication of the public's short attention span on and as a result of Facebook and Twitter. Life goes on without your tweets, JT.

Most importantly, this is a classic example of the inability to generate online buzz through the use of traditional media. If any digital media awareness is achieved at all, that New York Times trend story or glossy print blurb in People is a product of online fodder.

PR Play Rating:
1 Clueless
2 Ill-advised
3 On the right track
4 Savvy
5 Ingenious

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