Influencing the 'super committee'

As the congressional super committee goes to work at slashing away at the government's debt, The Washington Post has put together a nifty infographic detailing the members ties to various lobbying interests.

As the congressional super committee goes to work at slashing away at the government's debt, The Washington Post has put together a nifty infographic detailing the members ties to various lobbying interests.

Nearly 100 former aides to members of the new budget-cutting "supercommittee" now work as K Street lobbyists, often representing clients with a vested interest in the panel's decisions. A half dozen former lobbyists are also currently employed by the lawmakers.

Washington, DC, is a small town, so this type of coziness isn't new - not that this means it shouldn't be pointed out. You'll recall that even President Obama had a difficult time keeping lobbyist ties from his administration despite an initial campaign pledge.

It's also a city of dealmakers. Former friends can suddenly find themselves in opposite corners, while one-time foes link up for new ventures.

Profiles of the super dozen can be found here. What they choose to keep and cut by their Thanksgiving deadline has many special interest groups worried. A Reuters report suggests the healthcare lobby fears the potential cuts enough that it is hoping the group will fail, which would put in place more palatable automatic reductions in spending.

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