Google needs IR help

The Google stock debacle of last week should be a lesson to all public companies, especially Google, that avoidable hits to the stock should not occur.

The Google stock debacle of last week should be a lesson to all public companies, especially Google, that avoidable hits to the stock should not occur.

This one is Exhibit A of an entirely unnecessary embarrassment that will shadow Google for some time to come.

Here was a case where the company clearly must have known that earnings wouldn't meet expectations because of an increased tax burden. But, instead of issuing suitable advisories, Google never even hinted at the prospect of lower- than-anticipated results.

Clearly, Google needs someone in their loop with investor relations know-how. I plan to offer myself and my 50 years in the business as the counselor it clearly needs.

Irving Straus
Chairman, Straus Corporate Communications, New York


Cost of independence

In the January 2 issue, Michael Bush wrote of a "newly formed independent group" that is launching a pro-Wal-Mart campaign. Later in the article, he noted that Wal-Mart is "lending financial support" to the group.

How can a pro-Wal-Mart group possibly be independent if given financial support from Wal-Mart? The fact that Wal-Mart is supporting the group financially destroys the credibility of the entity.

Ken Gullette
Moline, IL

 

A not-so-savvy rating

Apparently you've inhaled a bit too much of the Donald's hair- care products. Giving the pompous pompadour (Mr. Trump) a "savvy" rating in PR Play of the Week (PRWeek, January 30) for his counterproductive decision to sue journalist Timothy O'Brien over his book is a sad commentary on what PRWeek sees as good PR.

"Clueless" would be a much fairer rating for Trump's arrogant decision to take on a journalist because his ego has been damaged. By filing a suit, he's shown not only a remarkable lack of class, but he has also drawn attention to his attacker and his book.

Had Trump been working for O'Brien, his move might have earned him a "savvy" rating.

By showing himself as a litigious, thin-skinned bully, however, he's only cemented many of the comments made in O'Brien's book.

Michael Miller
President, Brown Miller Communications, Martinez, CA

 

Corrections

In last week's feature, "When research made a difference," we noted that Dow Chemical marketed Saran Wrap and Silly Putty. Saran Wrap was sold to SC Johnson in the '90s, and Dow never had marketed Silly Putty. In addition, we should have clarified that controversial silicon breast implants were developed by Dow Corning, which is jointly owned by Dow Chemical and Corning Inc.

In that issue's Expert Advice column, Donna Renella's title should have read VP, talent, Weber Shandwick. PRWeek apologizes for the errors.

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