Honeywell partners with Nobel Media for education initiative

MORRIS TOWNSHIP, NJ AND STOCKHOLM: Global manufacturer Honeywell and Nobel Media have launched a global science education campaign, linking Nobel Prize winners with university students.

MORRIS TOWNSHIP, NJ AND STOCKHOLM: Global manufacturer Honeywell and Nobel Media have launched a global science education campaign, linking Nobel Prize winners with university students.

The campaign is intended to give students a first-hand opportunity to learn from the world's foremost chemistry and physics experts through live on-campus events, interactive content, and broadcast programming.

Honeywell will promote the campaign with an extensive media relations, marketing, and advertising campaign, according to Tom Buckmaster, president of Honeywell Hometown Solutions, the company's philanthropic arm, and global sponsor of the campaign.

"The program is designed to be truly global in nature," Buckmaster said. "We'll use all kinds of vehicles and tactics including the media to broadly connect with people."

The effort includes "Nobel Minds" a 60-minute program on BBC and other networks featuring current Nobel Laureates; Honeywell Nobel Laureate Lecture Series, a three-year program of college events in China, the Czech Republic, India and US that includes public lectures, classes, and receptions with Nobel Laureates; and Honeywell Nobel Interactive Studio, an online forum where Laureates "explain the science behind their Nobel Prizes." The online component will be linked from Honeywell.com beginning in July 2006.

Honeywell will also sponsor educational materials in chemistry and physics developed by Nobel Web and hosted on Nobelprize.org. This campaign stems from Honeywell's Science Education Initiative, which is geared towards promoting engineering and science to students, beginning in middle schools.

The company teamed up with Nobel because it wanted a global, best-in-class brand to help it reach university students.

"This positions Honeywell in a way that is consistent with our brand promise," Buckmaster said. "It's not enough to just do good work; we need to do good work that's relevant to our company and our stakeholders."

 

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