EPA seeks firm to assist with its aging campaign

WASHINGTON: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is looking for a firm to provide communications support to increase awareness of environmental health issues.

WASHINGTON: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is looking for a firm to provide communications support to increase awareness of environmental health issues.

The RFP is part of the EPA's Aging Initiative, which educates older Americans about the toll environmental damage can take on their health. A Web site, for instance, lists fact sheets about health issues like asthma, household pests, and excessive heat.

Under the contract, the selected firm will create a social marketing program targeting senior citizens and their caregivers. It will also reach out to non-English speakers, those with a low level of health literacy, minorities, veterans, healthcare providers, and baby boomers.

The firm will prepare and distribute printed materials on environmental health concerns, including multilingual brochures, fact sheets, reports, newsletters, and HTML pages.

These materials will be distributed at events such as World Asthma Day, Earth Day, Older Americans Month, and professional association meetings.

The campaign will also direct senior citizens to the Aging Initiative Web site, as well as expand membership on the Aging Initiative listserv.

There is no incumbent on the account, and terms were not disclosed. The contract is for a year with a one-year option to renew.

Through the Aging Initiative, the EPA plans to study how environmental hazards impact older adults, and conversely, how a rapidly aging population affects the environment.

The number of adults 65 and older is expected to double by 2030, and senior citizens will comprise 20% of the US population, a heretofore unseen demographic shift.

The EPA is concerned about how life-long exposure to environmental toxins impacts older adults, as well as older adults' susceptibility to contaminants.

Similar EPA projects around aging include promoting "smart growth," or reducing so-called urban sprawl.

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