CAIR rebranding stresses group's cooperative efforts

WASHINGTON: The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a nonprofit civil rights and advocacy organization, has launched a rebranding effort, including a new logo, to better convey its work with other community groups and the government.

WASHINGTON: The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a nonprofit civil rights and advocacy organization, has launched a rebranding effort, including a new logo, to better convey its work with other community groups and the government.

CAIR board chairman Parvez Ahmed said the 12-year-old group decided to create a more "open" logo, make its annual report available online, and establish more uniform communications practices among its 33 US chapters to combat the sometimes hazy perceptions of CAIR's mission.

CAIR debuted its new logo at the Islamic Society of North America convention in Chicago over Labor Day weekend. Media relations will be a part of its public outreach.

"We needed a way to communicate more clearly that, yes, we are an Islamic organization [and] our policies and viewpoints are certainly informed by Islam, but we are also an American organization, which means that we work in the best interest of America," Ahmed said.

CAIR wants to stress that it works with a variety of advocacy and inter-faith groups on shared goals, meets regularly with members of Congress, and works with law enforcement authorities, he added.

The rebranding was conceived and managed entirely in-house, though a design firm created the new logo, which features four people of different colors holding hands around the five pillars of Islam. CAIR will also relaunch its Web site in the coming months.

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