Media and corporations

According to the New York Times, spying on reporters is more common that one might think. The HP scandal may have brought...

According to the New York Times, spying on reporters is more common that one might think. The HP scandal may have brought this topic to the forefront, but it seems that others are not above using covert means to root out how reporters are getting information, as well as how their reporting efforts are progressing.

I have a feeling that if one were to bug the boardrooms of corporate America today, there would be a lot more sympathy for Patricia Dunn and HP than for the spied-on journalists.

Few CEOs would have qualms about nosing out those individuals who are passing on confidential information to the media. If only they didn't get caught in the act! Just a thought, but it might be more prudent to focus efforts on why the company culture is leading these trusted and high-ranking individuals to disclose these secrets in the first place.

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