Moms like us…

Previously, Michael Bush wrote about McDonald's "mom's quality correspondence" campaign. His words below:

"OAK BROOK, IL: As part of the recently launched McDonald's...

Previously, Michael Bush wrote about McDonald's "mom's quality correspondence" campaign. His words below:

"OAK BROOK, IL: As part of the recently launched McDonald's "moms' quality correspondence" campaign, six moms from across the country are getting access to the QSR leader through various interactions with the company, its executives, and vendors.

The first meeting between the moms and McDonald's took place in early June at the company's global headquarters in Oak Brook, IL. Future interactions will include a visit to a beef supplier in August and a "farm field" and produce supplier in September.

Tara Lazarus Hayes, manager of US communications at McDonald's, said that after each interaction, the moms will write about their experiences and have them posted, unedited by McDonald's, online at McDonaldsmom.com for other consumers to read."

Well, those experiences have popped up online at Mcdonalds.com, and they are universally positive. Not a criticism among the bunch, as far as I could tell.

Nicole Woodcock writes, at the MS&L Blogworks blog, about McDonald's (non-client):
There certainly is a chance that a mom could post something negative about their encounters, but after reading the highly positive remarks from their first posts, I think McDonald’s is pulling out all the stops to make sure these moms and their meals are kept happy.

The online community has strong opinions on McDonald’s tactics. Mom sites are upset that McDonald’s selected six relatively unknown mothers instead of working with already established mom sites. Many moms will undoubtedly trust their favorite mom blog over a corporate site full of women they have no connection with. It is surprising that McDonald’s fails to see the advantages of going with trusted moms, or perhaps they are afraid of what they will really say. Whatever opinions the six moms share, any credibility is weakened by McDonald’s corporate stronghold.

Indeed, it would probably be beneficial for one of the moms to post negative commentary (preferably something less critical than "McDonald's must die!") so the public becomes less skeptical of the moms' content.

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