Call for green seconded

As designers who believe that small changes can make a big difference, especially within the graphic design industry where the end product relies heavily on natural resources like paper, we were thrilled to see Sarah Gerrol's letter ("Turning PR green," PRWeek, June 18).

As designers who believe that small changes can make a big difference, especially within the graphic design industry where the end product relies heavily on natural resources like paper, we were thrilled to see Sarah Gerrol's letter ("Turning PR green," PRWeek, June 18).

We service a number of New York PR firms, and many are now challenged with the question, "How can we go green?"

That's why we're inspiring our clients to join our own sustainable design efforts and create a cycle of change that will make a difference. In PR alone, think of the number of printing needs (from event signage to press kit covers) that could make a difference if responsible paper and printing choices are made.

We have a responsibility to help clients make eco-friendly choices throughout the design process. Some major changes within our own office include converting to 100% wind power, restructuring our vendor base to include printers certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and specifying FSC paper stocks from mills that are using green power.

The end goal is to encourage the elimination of deforestation, which negatively reshapes our climate, geography, and biodiversity.

We know we can't save the environment alone, but we can extend our efforts to the decision makers, agencies, clients, designers, and the end-user.
Thanks for putting forth the importance of PR going green!           

Debra Rizzi
Partner, Rizco Design
Manasquan, NJ

Don't redefine vacation

I was horrified to read the June 25 Expert Advice column. After reading the posed question about the need to stay in touch with the office while away, I thought the Ketchum rep (in HR no less) would talk about the importance of work-life balance.

Unfortunately, she talked about how "sometimes part of being a good employee means doing some work while you're away." I realize that most people in PR are workaholics, myself included, but it's important and healthy to take a step back and take a break from the madness.
 
When your colleagues go on vacation, it should be understood that everyone will pitch in a little extra to pick up the slack; that way when you get an opportunity to take a vacation, you don't have to be disturbed by work. With as little vacation time as Americans receive, that's not too much to ask for.

While in very rare cases it may be necessary to bring work on vacation, as long as your clients are notified that you're on leave and they know the proper people to contact in your absence, staffers should have every right to take a vacation and not feel the need to have their cell phone, laptop, and BlackBerry with them. It's sad that this thinking is being set as a precedent for young PR pros.

Scott Shadiow
Account supervisor, Dorland Global Public Relations
San Francisco

Correction

In the July 2 Global Special, we incorrectly reported Edelman's US revenue for 2006 as its global revenue for that year. The correct global revenue for '06 was approximately $328 million. We regret the error.

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