HP continues 'Print 2.0' with $300m campaign

NEW YORK: Hewlett-Packard has launched a $300 million global marketing campaign to spur the second phase of its Print 2.0 initiative.

NEW YORK: Hewlett-Packard has launched a $300 million global marketing campaign to spur the second phase of its Print 2.0 initiative.

Launched in May, Print 2.0 is an ongoing effort to reposition the company in the digital and Web-based printing market. The campaign targets the consumer market, as well as small and mid-sized businesses with interactive Web features.

To kick off the next phase of campaign, HP hosted a two-day conference last week that detailed the new features.

"The marketing campaign is about bringing Print 2.0 to a broader audience," said Alyson Griffin, HP's director of worldwide influencer communications. "It's about not just keeping it at the theoretical, influencer level, but making it real."

The company is now unveiling ways to make Print 2.0 relevant to consumers, she added.

The consumer push is anchored by a site featuring Gwen Stefani that lets users mash some of the singer's licensed materials with their own content to print items like personalized greeting cards and CD labels.

Other Web-based features include brand-identity tools geared toward small and mid-sized businesses, like customized business cards and brochures based on professional templates. In addition, Patrick Scaglia, HP CTO for the imaging and printing group, has launched a blog that discusses Print 2.0 efforts.

"From a consumer perspective, we're focusing our campaign around achievers," Griffin said. "This is a really groundbreaking experience that we're giving to our customers."

The company also launched a wiki feature for consumers to give feedback in real time and communicate with other users. Griffin said interactive engagement is consistent with the campaign's theme - "What do you have to say?"

Other efforts included an interactive billboard in Times Square that featured a Gwen Stefani paper doll that users could dress up by sending text messages.

The next phase will continue its outreach to consumers and small and mid-sized businesses, said Griffin, but will also feature a stronger push toward other HP customer segments - the enterprise and graphic users.

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