Lessons hopefully learned

We knew our most recent cover story, “Rules of engagement change with blogs,” (sub req'd) would feature some critical opinions. But we hoped bloggers...

We knew our most recent cover story, “Rules of engagement change with blogs,” (sub req'd) would feature some critical opinions. But we hoped bloggers would say, "While I might have issues with some PR people trying to dictate message, I can at least report that I'm only receiving relevant pitches."

Sadly, the latter part of that statement was, in fact, the common complaint.
Gawker managing editor Choire Sicha has worked for newspapers, including The New York Observer and The New York Times. Being "inundated with bad pitches all day" negatively affects his opinion of PR. "I play this game with a friend [at] The New York Times where we send [each other] the worst headlines from press releases," he says. "The worst stuff comes from top-tier places, as well as places we've never heard of."

With few exceptions, Gina Trapani, editor of Lifehacker (who wasn't trained in journalism), has had "terrible" experiences with PR - primarily because she gets so many irrelevant press releases. In fact, she has created a filter to ignore PR messages automatically.

The fact remains that influential bloggers’ mostly negative responses to PR pitches come from real-world interactions. If the industry considers bloggers important enough to pitch, it has to likewise heed the feedback if any relationship can have a chance to grow.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.