Unhappy passengers set stage for state legislation

A New York State law, set to take effect January 1, could require that domestic airlines provide services to passengers who sit for longer than 3 hours, a piece of legislation undoubtedly influenced by the passengers' rights movement, reports The New York Times.

A New York State law, set to take effect January 1, could require that domestic airlines provide services to passengers who sit for longer than 3 hours, a piece of legislation undoubtedly influenced by the passengers' rights movement, reports TheNew York Times. Last year, Kate Hanni organized the Coalition for Airline Passengers' Bill of Rights, now a Web site (http://www.flyersrights.com/) – hotline included - with over 20,000 members lobbying for such legislation.

In response, Air Transport Association, the airline industry trade group, filed a complaint, the gist of which asserts that state intervention in their business is unconstitutional.

Also:

E! Online reports that Jay Leno and Conan O'Brien announced plans to return to the airwaves, with or without the writers, on January 2. Both hosts entered into individual deals with WGA, with terms ensuring a “quiet” return, unlike that of Carson Daly.

As the FCC nears decision time for two regulations that could shake up the media and telecommunications industries, the Wall Street Journal chronicles and comments on the unpopularity of FCC chairman Kevin Martin.

Gawker, Fishbowl NY, the Huffington Post, TVNewser, and the Observer printed a sugarcoated statement by CBS News spokesperson Dana McKlintock that seemingly avoided the issue of CBS Interactive's layoffs.

The New York Times profiles Ingrid Michaelson, whose self-promotion and MySpace page won the hearts of both fans and Lynn Grossman, the owner of artist management company Secret Road.

Loews exhales its tobacco holdings, in a move, according to The New York Times, to divest its interest in cigarette company Lorillard Tobacco. While analysts may attribute part of the act to social responsibility and corporate reputation, CEO James Tisch says it's a purely financial decision that will benefit shareholders.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.