Vanity Fair cancels its famous Oscar party

Oscar ceremony or no Oscar ceremony, Vanity Fair has canceled its multimillion-dollar after-party, an event where everyone who is anyone attends.

Oscar ceremony or no Oscar ceremony, Vanity Fair has canceled its multimillion-dollar after-party, an event where everyone who is anyone attends. The New York Times reports that Editor Greydon Carter's sympathy lies with the striking writers. He told the Times, “Whether the strike is over or not, there are a lot of bruised feelings. I don't think it's appropriate for a big magazine from the East to come in and pretend nothing happened.”

In December, Carter told WWD, "We're going ahead as planned, although we have made provisions for a shorter-than-usual ceremony. Since it's all hypothetical at the moment, it's difficult to comment further."

The Times adds that the cancelled party, usually a second red carpet for the stars, would have been the magazine's 15th.

The Oscar ceremony may go on without its stars, fearful of an inevitable picket, but the “real show” will be dark.

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