News outlets enjoying the election windfall

How will news networks ever adjust to post-election life, after the issues are debated, convention balloons are released, and the votes are tallied? For one, they'll likely take a considerable ratings hit.

How will news networks ever adjust to post-election life, after the issues are debated, convention balloons are released, and the votes are tallied? For one, they'll likely take a considerable ratings hit.

More than 7.8 million viewers tuned their TV sets to MSNBC to view Tuesday night's debate – the one where Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) claimed the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy, including Tim Russert, favors Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL). The ratings were the network's highest since the beginning of the Iraq War, when it scored a paltry-by-comparison 3.7 million viewers, but still not as high as the January 31 Democratic debate on CNN, which entranced more than 8.3 million viewers.

In focus: Pinch vs. Harbinger

Stonewalling no more, New York Times publisher Arthur “Pinch” Sulzberger is set to meet with Harbinger Capital, the Birmingham, AL-based investor that owns 19 percent of the newspaper's public stock.

While the Sulzbergers are far from packing up their offices, other well-known Times employees are asking around for boxes. Scott B. Meyer, About.com's chief executive, has announced that he is leaving the company next week, and Pulitzer Prize-winning Supreme Court reporter Linda Greenhouse has accepted a $300,000 buyout.

Also:

Meet the new president of Gannett's newspaper division, Robert J. Dickey.

The Los Angeles Daily News lets 22 staffers go.

Quarterly and annual earnings are down at the Washington Post Co., but the news isn't all bad for staffers, who now have their own game room.

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