Made in Italy, shown at Bergdorf Goodman

The Italian Trade Commission (ITC), in its "Global Travel" effort supporting the Italian textile industry, sponsored a Rhode Island School of Design semester-long Textile and Apparel course, in collaboration with 22 Italian fabric and yarn mills.

The Italian Trade Commission (ITC), in its “Global Travel” effort supporting the Italian textile industry, sponsored a Rhode Island School of Design semester-long Textile and Apparel course, in collaboration with 22 Italian fabric and yarn mills. Students were tasked with designing global-travel inspired collections, and on Tues, ITC installed the students' Global Travel exhibit at Bergdorf's.

The initiative, as part of ITC's “Let yourself be charmed by an Italian” campaign touting the high-quality and sophistication of Italian luxury goods, conjures the relevance of the “Made in Italy” label in fashion.

From the WWD spotlight on Global Travel: “Having worked with the ITC on many occasions, Bergdorf Goodman president and chief executive officer Jim Gold said it is important to promote innovation and Made in Italy products… ‘Ultimately we have got to compete on the basis of quality and innovation. It's our lifeblood.'”

Italy and its label have long stood for craftsmanship and “quality,” but not necessarily luxury, although the two often, and should, go hand-in-hand. So it makes sense that the label's prestige should prompt promotional campaigns, especially amid controversy about Italian brands outsourcing to China or importing foreign workers for cheap labor.

Nike Communications is handling promotional efforts for the campaign and did not call back in time to comment.

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Careful, that dance is trademarked
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“T” for Technology or sTyle?
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