Dunkin and Ray make fashion - and political - faux pas

Who knew the coffee business could be so controversial? Rachael Ray, the average person's Martha Stewart and Dunkin' Donuts spokes-eater, recently appeared in an iced coffee ad for the company sporting what she and her stylist thought was a fine looking scarf.

Who knew the coffee business could be so controversial? Rachael Ray, the average person's Martha Stewart and Dunkin' Donuts spokes-eater, recently appeared in an online iced coffee ad for the company sporting what she and her stylist thought was a fine looking scarf. You haven't seen the ad? Well that's because Dunkin' has since pulled it.

Blogger and Fox News contributor Michelle Malkin seized on the accessory, calling it the “clueless sporting of a jihadi chic keffiyeh.” (A keffiyeh is a scarf traditionally worn by Arab men.) Malkin goes on to write on her blog, “I'm hoping her hate couture choice was spurred more by ignorance than ideology.” Dunkin', not looking for a fight, issued a statement saying “no symbolism was intended” and that it has shelved the offending advertisement.

For Dunkin', it's unclear which is worse: drawing fire from a once supportive blogger or crumbling like a day-old donut when it does. The scarf was a questionable fashion statement, but no rational person thinks Ray was using her iced coffee in the park ad to make a political statement. Ray's personal blog did not address the gaffe. And while no one associates Dunkin' with terrorism, it might now be linked with cowardice.

PR Play Rating

1. Clueless
2. Ill-advised
3. On the right track
4. Savvy
5. Ingenious

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