Google CEO says 'Don't be evil' logo not intended for public

Eric Schmidt, Google CEO, tried to clarify the meaning behind the search engine's trademark slogan "Don't be evil." As Google has grown, the brand has come under increased scrutiny from a legion of critics who debate if "Don't be evil" can apply to a money-making entity on the rise.

Eric Schmidt, Google CEO, tried to clarify the meaning behind the search engine's trademark slogan “Don't be evil” recently. As Google has grown, the brand has come under increased scrutiny from a legion of critics who debate if "Don't be evil" can apply to a money-making entity on the rise.

During an on-stage interview, Schmidt explained that “Don't be evil” is actually not meant to be company's public position – it's supposed to spark internal ethical debates.

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