Intel maintains its outreach plans despite FTC scrutiny

SANTA CLARA, CA: Intel says its outreach to policy influencers has remained the same in the wake of a Federal Trade Commission investigation of its competitive practices in the microprocessor market.

SANTA CLARA, CA: Intel says its outreach to policy influencers has remained the same in the wake of a Federal Trade Commission investigation of its competitive practices in the microprocessor market.

Paul Bergevin, VP of Intel's global communications group, said the company began to intensify its public affairs outreach last summer, but current efforts are only a continuation of that strategy.

Bergevin added that Intel's key messages to policy influencers focus on conveying the challenges of operating in a highly regulated industry, its energy-saving efforts, education initiatives, its lower prices for consumers, and the amount of manufacturing it does in the US. Intel is working with Burson-Marsteller on policy outreach in the US.

"For a lot of people in DC, the idea that not only is Intel developing leading-edge products, but also that the vast majority of its manufacturing is being done in the [US] runs counter to people's perceptions," he added.

To deliver its messages, the company is targeting policy-centric outlets like Roll Call, Politico, and the Huffington Post, in addition to media like The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

The company is also developing a section of its Web site devoted to policy issues.

In a statement, Intel, which says its business practices are "well within US law," said it has been working with the FTC on "an informal inquiry into competition" since 2006.

Recent media reports have noted that Intel is facing antitrust regulatory reviews in other markets, including Europe, South Korea, and Japan. Intel competitor AMD was also cited in stories as pushing for the investigation. However, Mike Silverman, a PR manager at AMD, denied that, adding that the company is challenging those reports.

"Our message is that we are not looking for any special treatment at all," he explained. "We are looking for antitrust laws to be enforced. To call this a marketing campaign is an insult to the antitrust rulings."

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.

News by email...