World leaders feast amidst a food shortage

World leaders brought a large amount of media attention to the G8 Summit in Japan, but not in the best way: They hosted lavish feasts after discussing the world food crisis. From July 7 to 9, heads from eight of the world's wealthy nations, including President George Bush, discussed major global issues, including how to solve the rising costs of food.

World leaders brought a large amount of media attention to the G8 Summit in Japan, but not in the best way: They hosted lavish feasts after discussing the world food crisis. From July 7 to 9, heads from eight of the world's wealthy nations, including President George Bush, discussed major global issues, including how to solve the rising costs of food.

But just a day after the discussions on households wasting food, the leaders enjoyed what the UK's Daily Mail termed a "gastronomic extravaganza," courtesy of Michelin-star winning Japanese chef Katsuhiro Nakamura. Menu items for the six-course lunch and eight-course dinner, with more than a dozen dishes, included caviar, tuna, grilled eel, milk-fed lamb, and a G8 "Fantasy" dessert, according to the Daily Mail.

The feast rubbed activists the wrong way, with Dominic Nutt from Save the Children saying, "It is deeply hypocritical that they should be lavishing course after course on world leaders when there is a food crisis and millions cannot afford a decent meal."

The over-the-top meals only serve to detract from the good that might have happened at the summit, which Bush called "productive." Bottom line: Flaunt it if you got it doesn't apply when food riots are taking place in Haiti, Egypt, Indonesia, Somalia, and elsewhere.

PR play rating
1. Clueless

2. Ill-advised
3. On the right track
4. Savvy
5. Ingenious

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