Backlash to New Yorker cover draws its own backlash

The outrage over The New Yorker's cover depicting Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) and his wife - satirically - as radicals roasting Old Glory in the Oval Office fireplace has drawn a backlash of its own.

The outrage over The New Yorker's cover depicting Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) and his wife – satirically – as radicals roasting Old Glory in the Oval Office fireplace has drawn a backlash of its own. While Steve Young just doesn't find the image funny, and the Huffington Post's Thomas de Zengotita harrumphs that the New Yorker isn't actively campaigning for an Obama presidency, Slate's Jack Shafer counters by asking why the press feels they need to protect the common citizen from satirical images. Meanwhile, the Huffington Post's Richard Greene says the cover will benefit Obama's campaign, and The Washington Post's Chris Cillizza asks readers if this is another case of political campaigns using outrage to their advantage. Also, the Post's Phillip Kennicott ponders whether satire works in print in the age of YouTube.

 

Also in the media glare:

 

New York Times reporters are reminded of the “no bumper sticker rule” for this campaign season, now expanded to Facebook profiles.

 

The Chicago Tribune's new editor says he wants the newspaper to lighten up.

 

Blogs criticize Associated Press Washington bureau chief Ron Fournier for his 2004 “Keep up the fight” e-mail to Karl Rove. Fournier says he was caught up in the “breezy nature” of the conversation.

 

John McLaughlin draws heat for referring to Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) as an “Oreo.”

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