McDonald's brings back 1974 jingle in online contest

McDonald's reaches into the '70s for inspiration, Jesse Jackson-Obama drama continues, Writers Guild opens new campaign, and more

In an attempt to revive a classic, McDonald's is launching an effort to bring back its jingle from 1974, according to The New York Times.

The company is using MySpace to encourage consumers to use the same words of the original jingle – “Two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, on a sesame-seed bun” – to create their own song.

The company planned the effort to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the Big Mac, as well as with the cultural similarities of the '70s and now. McDonald's advertising company, DDB Worldwide, created a video component, which is available on the MySpace contest site.

“We knew there were a lot of consumers out there that would remember the chant, but we also felt like the younger audience was familiar with it, and we wanted them to give us a contemporary version,” Jaime Guerrero, account director at Tribal DDB Worldwide in Chicago, part of the DDB Worldwide unit of Omnicom, told The New York Times.

So far, almost 1,000 entries were submitted. McDonald's is encouraging the public to vote and a winner will be announced on Tuesday.

Also:

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Cable programs Mad Men and Damages won the top spots for the amount of Emmy nominations, but HBO's The Wire was snubbed with only one nomination.

Is Maxim trying to make nice with Sarah Jessica Parker after voting her "unsexiest women"?

Jesse Jackson fuels more criticism with an apparent use of the 'n' word while in an interview on presiential candidate Barack Obama.

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