Reporting in Beijing faces continued hurdles

The Olympics start next week, but journalists seeking to report on the current socio-political landscape in Beijing are reportedly facing challenges ranging from public violence to police interference, the Guardian reported.

The Olympics start next week, but journalists seeking to report on the current socio-political landscape in Beijing are reportedly facing challenges ranging from public violence to police interference, the Guardian reported. A YouTube news clip from Asia also looks at the issue.

In addition, the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) partnered with the Hong Kong Journalists' Association (HKJA) to call on the Chinese government to “ensure all law enforcement agencies abide by the Regulations [on Reporting Activities] and allow journalists from within and without China to work freely.”

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) responded to journalists' complaints that alleged Chinese censorship and slow Internet connections at Olympic press centers. Several groups, such as Amnesty International said that access to its Web site was blocked in China. The group recently released a report critical of the country.

Also:

Environmental Protection Agency staff were directed to forward all media requests to press officers in an internal memo obtained by The Washington Post. A spokesperson for the government agency, though, said the missive did not represent a change in policy, only a desire to make responses consistent and more efficient.

Chinese advertisers play up Olympic athletes' relationship with their parents in ads in a bid to reach local sentimental tendencies.

Richard Branson expands the Virgin brand yet again with consumer-based space tourism jet.

GM Europe unveils a new brand logo for Opel and Vauxhall.

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