Huggies, Pull-Ups connect diapers with Hispanic moms

NEENAH, WI: Kimberly-Clark's Huggies and Pull-Ups recently launched "Tren de Vida" (Train of Life) a campaign intended to connect its diapers with Hispanic mothers in a culturally relevant way.

NEENAH, WI: Kimberly-Clark's Huggies and Pull-Ups recently launched “Tren de Vida” (Train of Life) a campaign intended to connect its diapers with Hispanic mothers in a culturally relevant way.

With the support of Hispania PR and MASS Hispanic Marketing, the campaign will seek to reach Hispanic mothers, including unacculturated moms, at more than 100 venues across the US, including relevant festivals, like the Mexican Independence Day Festival at Whittier Narrows Park in Los Angeles, from where the campaign launched September 14.

During these events, the company will provide branded changing stations and seek to create a genuine dialogue with mothers by gathering child-rearing tips for a branded book entitled, “De Mama à Mama” (Mom to Mom), which will be published in April.

The recently launched, HuggiesEnEspanol.com, will also serve as an outlet for collecting tips.

“We know this is an audience that is growing, and we really want to connect with them, and create an experience that will involve them with our products in a way that connects with the reality of their everyday life,” said Irma Tavlian, baby and childcare consumer protection team leader for Kimberly-Clark.

“El Incomparable Tren de Mama" (Mom's Incomparable Daily Routine) is a key message of the campaign, Tavlian noted.

Media outreach to these mothers will focus on radio, including promotion by radio host and psychologist, Dr. Isabel Gómez-Bassols, according to Sergio López-Miró, president of Hispania PR, who is leading the effort.

Face-to-face meetings at events and radio outlets serve as the best way to reach these targeted mothers, said López-Miró, because the campaign is built on the cultural experience of many Latina mothers relying on extended networks of aunts, sisters, and grandmothers to help raise their children.

“Oftentimes, when mothers come to this country there is not the same support network for these women to rely on,” said López-Miró, “This campaign was created to help fill that void, and help moms interact.”

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