Scouts aim to get girls interested in science

NEW YORK: Girl Scouts of the USA has teamed up with the Ad Council and Patrice Tanaka & Company (PT&Co.) to develop a campaign designed to boost girls' interests in math, science, and technology.

NEW YORK: Girl Scouts of the USA has teamed up with the Ad Council and Patrice Tanaka & Company (PT&Co.) to develop a campaign designed to boost girls' interests in math, science, and technology.

The initiative comprises a series of TV, radio, print, and internet PSAs created by The Kaplan Thaler Group. The PSAs depict humorous interactions between parents and young girls discussing math, science, and technology.

While influencing young girls is the ultimate goal of the campaign, the short-term objective is to persuade their influencers to change the cultural cues girls typically receive. It is a national call to action for parents, caregivers, and other involved adults to empower girls to embrace these subjects.

PT&Co. has been working with the Girl Scouts since 1998 to help the organization contemporize its image. The agency's efforts will be on a national level, while the 316 chapters of Girl Scouts carry out the effort locally through community outreach. "We'll be reaching out with these PSAs to media outlets throughout the country equally," reported Fran Kelly, president and cofounder of PT&Co. "Because the Girl Scouts have a presence in every zip code, we anticipate a positive response from every region."

All of the PSAs direct viewers and listeners to the campaign's website, www.girlsgotech.org, for specific ideas on how to engage girls in the subjects. "The whole focus of the campaign is to be informative and not punitive," said Liz Sheppard, senior director of marketing and communications for the Girl Scouts. "We are trying to communicate how prevalent these subject areas are in everyday life, and offer suggestions on how adults can help girls get involved."

According to the National Science Foundation, women represent 46% of the total workforce, but only 25% work in the technology industry. That number drops to 10% among the nation's top technology jobs.

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