MEDIA WATCH: Money is main part of March Madness

On Monday, March 15, The Wall Street Journal displayed a two-page spread of the 2004 NCAA men's basketball tournament brackets, signifying that March Madness has made it in corporate America. Office workers compiled collegiate picks across the country in anticipation of the sports classic. With billions of dollars involved through gaming, advertising, tickets, and teams, the tournament has become both a piece of Americana and a big-business enterprise.

On Monday, March 15, The Wall Street Journal displayed a two-page spread of the 2004 NCAA men's basketball tournament brackets, signifying that March Madness has made it in corporate America. Office workers compiled collegiate picks across the country in anticipation of the sports classic. With billions of dollars involved through gaming, advertising, tickets, and teams, the tournament has become both a piece of Americana and a big-business enterprise.

Most frequent messages

1. Estimated $2.5 billion wagered from office pools to online gaming

2. Estimated $1.5 billion lost in worker productivity

3. $6 billion spent by CBS for broadcast rights

4. NCAA controls advertising on and off the court

5. Smaller college programs seeking the revenue/benefits of winning

Based on 134 articles from major US media outlets from team selection (March 14) to tip-off (March 18)

Evaluation and analysis by Cymfony, Inc.

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