Pottery Barn press statement denies broken-items rule

SAN FRANCISCO: Miffed at widespread media references to "the Pottery Barn rule," the home-furnishing chain felt it necessary to issue a statement Tuesday clarifying that it has no such policy.

SAN FRANCISCO: Miffed at widespread media references to "the Pottery Barn rule," the home-furnishing chain felt it necessary to issue a statement Tuesday clarifying that it has no such policy.

In his new book, Plan of Attack, political author Bob Woodward claims that Secretary of State Colin Powell and his deputy, Richard Armitage, compared the war in Iraq to mishaps in a Pottery Barn: "You break it, you own it."

Recognizing that in-store items sometimes get broken or damaged, company officials wrote in the statement, "We see this as a cost of doing business and would not require a customer to pay for an item that he/she inadvertently broke in our store."

The statement garnered coverage by several national news outlets, but by Wednesday, Pottery Barn officials declared the case closed.

"That confusion about our policy has been corrected, and it's not something we want to discuss further," said PR director Leigh Oshirak.

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