PUBLICIST: Stars do shine in New York, but not as brightly as in Hollywood

It didn't take long to feel like a flag-waving Patrick Henry. A burger for $16? At a diner? Patriotism is expensive here.

It didn't take long to feel like a flag-waving Patrick Henry. A burger for $16? At a diner? Patriotism is expensive here.

It didn't take long to feel like a flag-waving Patrick Henry. A burger for $16? At a diner? Patriotism is expensive here.

New York is like Disneyland on crack. When did they add so much neon to Times Square? And who are all these people? How may have written screenplays?

New York is less crime-ridden now, thanks to increased security. There's even a PR campaign underway concerning subway safety. "If you see something, say something." The only untoward thing I witnessed was an overly amorous young couple across the aisle. In trying to heed the sign's advice, the only thing I could think of to say was, "Do you have a video on the internet?"

Sitting next to me was a couple of, naturally, film publicists. One had worked in LA, but told me she came back to New York for the "quality of life." I was going to ask how a $16 burger added to one's quality of life, but let it go.

Her name was Melanie. (I was forbidden to use her surname. Being a publicist, she of course couldn't be caught dead speaking to the media. What's next, doctors working with sick people? Where would it end?) She briefly broke down LA-New York differences.

"I socialize with journalists more here. In LA, I only saw my press contacts at events. In Hollywood, no one seems to want to go anywhere unless work is involved. Fun is secondary."

I dunno. I have fun. But then, I haven't had a real job in seven years.

Back to Melanie.

"The other difference is that the movie industry does not run this town like it does in LA. We aren't obsessed. We talk about films, but it's not the only topic of conversation. We don't worship at the shrine of celebrity."

Oh, really. The Apple's most famous denizen, the Donald himself, covets Hollywood glamour so much that he plays den mother to a bunch of obnoxious wannabes on television. I get the feeling he'd trade a Trump Tower for a People magazine cover. The man with all the money in the world would rather have fame. What does that tell you?

Truth is, New York and LA are both celebrity obsessed. We just bow a little lower in Tinseltown.

Lawrence Mitchell Garrison is an LA-based freelance publicist and writer

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