Nonprofit advocacy group sends 'Super Size Me' to Congress to further cause

WASHINGTON: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a nonprofit advocacy group, is sending members of Congress free copies of the film Super Size Me to increase support for a nutrition bill.

WASHINGTON: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a nonprofit advocacy group, is sending members of Congress free copies of the film Super Size Me to increase support for a nutrition bill.

"The thing that really swayed us, if you watch the movie and watch how much money is placed in advertising ... it's not a level playing field," said Howard White, the group's senior PR officer.

PCRM is not working with a PR agency.

One group has issued a response to the effort.

"Super Size Me is a distortion of epic proportions," said Marshall Manson, VP of public affairs for the Center for Individual Freedom, in a statement.

"[Director Morgan] Spurlock would like us to believe that his weight gain and poor health was McDonald's fault, when in reality, the only person Spurlock can blame is himself."

White defended the choice of the film.

"It really speaks to the heart of the American obesity epidemic," he said. "Even doctors didn't realize how deleterious the effects of fast food are."

The bill, the Healthy Lifestyles Act, would replace the current government body that sets nutrition policy, the US Department of Agriculture, with the Department of Health and Human Services and the independent Institute of Medicine.

PCRM and the bill's sponsors believe that the USDA cannot objectively set policy because of ties to the food industry.

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