'Daily News' acts quickly to explain contest's mistake

NEW YORK: The New York Daily News has been working with Dan Klores Communications as it faces disgruntled readers and perhaps multiple lawsuits after an error left thousands of readers believing they had won anywhere from $5,000 to $100,000 in its

NEW YORK: The New York Daily News has been working with Dan Klores Communications as it faces disgruntled readers and perhaps multiple lawsuits after an error left thousands of readers believing they had won anywhere from $5,000 to $100,000 in its

The Daily News began working with DKC on March 20 to formulate the proper response to the situation, said Sean Cassidy, DKC president. He added that the consensus was to act quickly to satisfy readers.

Eileen Murphy, VP of corporate communications at the Daily News, said that it was critical to emphasize to the public that the paper was not at fault.

The misprint, which occurred on a game card in the March 19 issue, was the mistake of DL Blair, a contest company with which the Daily News has worked for several years.

Murphy said the paper is examining its relationship with the company.

"We think it's important to point out where the mistake took place," she said. "We did not have a way to check and verify that the numbers were correct."

The paper held a March 21 news conference to announce a $1 million raffle drawing for those readers who felt they were winners of the flawed game.

"We thought it was important for the paper to apologize," Murphy said. "By coming to the table with a million dollars ... we feel that was really our good-faith effort to say to our readers that we understand."

Yet the raffle has done little to quiet some of those angry readers. Both Newsday and the New York Post have reported that several readers are planning to file lawsuits against the paper.

"We are not in receipt of any litigation," Murphy said. "We have found that most of our readers ... understand that things happen. It was clearly a mistake."

She added that there isn't any concern for long-term damage to the paper's reputation.

"We have no reason to believe the long history the paper has enjoyed with its readers is in any sort of jeopardy," she said.

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