'Standard' turns to 360 for circulation boost

WASHINGTON: The Weekly Standard has tapped 360Advantage, a new public affairs partnership between WPP shops Burson-Marsteller and Quinn Gillespie & Associates, for a campaign to boost the conservative magazine's circulation.

WASHINGTON: The Weekly Standard has tapped 360Advantage, a new public affairs partnership between WPP shops Burson-Marsteller and Quinn Gillespie & Associates, for a campaign to boost the conservative magazine's circulation.

Russ Schriefer, 360's president and a former strategist for Bush's re-election campaign, said the he intends to run the magazine's effort in the style of a political campaign.

"I don't think you've seen a magazine being sold like this before," he said.

The effort currently features two ads. The first shows a news reporter interviewing a TV anchor who reveals his newsroom has a liberal bias. In the second, the same reporter interviews a Kansas family on the National Mall - loyal Standard readers - who are on their way to meet the President.

The ads air on Fox News Channel and other cable outlets.

According to Capell's Circulation Report, the Standard was among the nation's top-five circulation gainers last year.

Schriefer added that work for the Standard started when he and Stuart Stevens, who is also heading up the new group, operated their own strategic communications firm, The Stevens and Schriefer Group. Stevens was also a Bush campaign strategist.

The formation of 360 was announced last month. The group will share communications and political pros from Burson's sister companies, including BKSH & Associates and Direct Impact.

Richard Mintz, chair of Burson's global public affairs practice, said 360 was formed to take advantage of the growing importance of political campaign styles in corporate communications and marketing campaigns.

"We would like to be the firm at the forefront of major policy issues in Washington and beyond," said Schriefer.

In 2003, WPP Group bought Quinn Gillespie after a deal by Omnicom to make the firm part of Fleishman-Hillard fell apart a year before.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.