Gavin Anderson president leaves to become partner at Brunswick

NEW YORK: Robert Mead is leaving his post as Gavin Anderson's president, deputy CEO, and worldwide head of the Americas to join Brunswick Group as a partner.

NEW YORK: Robert Mead is leaving his post as Gavin Anderson's president, deputy CEO, and worldwide head of the Americas to join Brunswick Group as a partner.

"[Mead] is really one of the top, most experienced communications professionals in New York," said Brunswick senior partner Steve Lipin. "He was sought after."

Mead will likely not begin at Brunswick until this fall. "I'm really looking forward to being in a private setting," he said.

Both Mead and Lipin said that they expect Mead's experience in corporate positioning, crisis work, and issues management to round out Brunswick's capabilities in those areas.

Brunswick has been enjoying a brisk year so far, advising on more that $80 billion worth of M&A deals in the first quarter.

Mead will be based in New York, and spend "considerable time" in Brunswick's DC office engaged in public affairs work. He brings the number of Brunswick's US partners to seven, Lipin said.

Gavin Anderson chairman and CEO Richard Constant has picked Montieth Illingworth to head the firm's New York office. He said that Illingworth joined the agency last November to run the office because Mead was "maxed out on clients."

He added that Illingworth is working with headhunter firms to search for more partners to join the office, because "it's one of our biggest strategic priorities to grow that operation."

Both of those decisions were planned before Mead's departure, Constant said.

"This is just a generational succession that I've been expecting any time these last five years," he said.

There are no immediate plans, however, to name a direct successor to Mead's title of president and deputy CEO.

"I am the one who gave him that title, president, and there were days when I was pleased with that, and days when I regretted it," said Constant. "I'm not in any rush to make the next president someone in New York. It doesn't go with the New York job."

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