Group pushes PR to foster country’s ’cultural health’

WASHINGTON, DC: Local groups promoting ’cultural health’ and other causes often fall over themselves - sometimes spectacularly - in attempting to generate attention and positive PR. A new non-profit, non-partisan organization to be unveiled on Wednesday at the National Press Club, however, hopes to change this.

WASHINGTON, DC: Local groups promoting ’cultural health’ and other causes often fall over themselves - sometimes spectacularly - in attempting to generate attention and positive PR. A new non-profit, non-partisan organization to be unveiled on Wednesday at the National Press Club, however, hopes to change this.

WASHINGTON, DC: Local groups promoting ’cultural health’ and other

causes often fall over themselves - sometimes spectacularly - in

attempting to generate attention and positive PR. A new non-profit,

non-partisan organization to be unveiled on Wednesday at the National

Press Club, however, hopes to change this.



While the organization, the Healthy Culture Initiative (HCI), is not

openly labeling its operations as PR, it is attempting to promote

’public education’ about the often unrecognized power local residents

have in combating social ills and other problems.



’The goal is to create a national dialogue on America’s cultural

health,’ said Cindy Cobb, HCI’s executive director. ’We want to help

people create their own stories by showing how others have been

successful.’ She said the group’s immediate goal is to develop a network

of success stories and include all the information in a searchable Web

database.



Cobb said that the HCI’s key dilemma is breaking through the media’s

emphasis on negative information. ’You would be hard-pressed to find

someone who feels they haven’t been barraged by bad news,’ she said,

emphasizing that the effort is not just directed toward areas commonly

portrayed in the media as being in decline (such as inner cities), but

also to areas where affluence can obscure troubling social problems.



The HCI intends to unveil seven indicators it believes are vital to the

country’s cultural health. If the campaign goes as planned, mayors of

cities will sponsor summits and encourage residents to determine where

change is needed. The hope is that once the success stories are more

heavily publicized, public/private partnerships will be galvanized to

implement similar solutions.



Former Marine Corps Commandant Chuck Krulak, now a senior vice-chair of

MBNA Bank, is serving as the organization’s national strategic

advisor.



Initial honorary co-chairs include Senators Sam Brownback and Joseph

Lieberman, and Rep. Henry Bonilla. The organization will be

headquartered in Wichita, KS.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.